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What Church Teams Should Learn from the U.S. Olympic Team

August 13, 2012

The U.S. Olympic team won the overall medal count with a total of 104 medals and the gold medal count with a total of 46 gold medals.

When asked why he thought the U.S. team was so successful, swimming star Ryan Lochte said the spirit in the U.S. camp was the primary reason behind its exceptional performance. “The whole team supports each other, and that is a huge thing,” said Lochte. “You take out anything negative … and good things happen.”

The U.S. Olympic team believes it performs best when there is support. You and your team do too. What keeps your team from performing at their best? The most common culprit is a lack of support.

So how does your team create support? 

 1. Private Feedback/Public Praise

“Be a raving fan publicly and an honest critic privately.” – Andy Stanley

Time and time again the TV camera would catch an American athlete (swimmers, gymnasts, runners, etc.) encouraging another American athlete. I couldn’t help but imagine the private, robust conversations they’ve probably had in the past to help each other improve. But the olympics was a time to encourage each other!

Is your team consistently supporting each other publicly? Are there opportunities for honest feedback privately?

 2. Take out the negative

Ryan Lochte said, “Take out the negative and good things happen.” A negative atmosphere will KILL chemistry every time. That means we’ve got to eliminate the negative.

A negative person, ministry, or situation will create a bad atmosphere. Dealing with each honestly and quickly is difficult but critical.

Chemistry is critically important and should be measured during the hiring process. I shared some thoughts about that HERE.

Why is this important? Though we’re not pursuing medals, we are equipping and encouraging people to pursue crowns.

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From → Leadership, Ministry

2 Comments
  1. Daniel Hahn permalink

    Gold medal blog—once again. D.

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